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Car Accident Compensation for Pain and Suffering.

Can you claim car accident compensation for pain and suffering in NSW?

Car accident compensation for pain and suffering is a lump sum that’s awarded to you to compensate you for the harmful impact your injury has had on you, both mentally and physically. It’s also referred to as general damages or non-economic loss.

However, not everyone who’s injured in a car accident in NSW is entitled to claim pain and suffering. In this article we explain:


Can I claim car accident compensation for pain and suffering in NSW?

If you’ve been injured in a motor accident in NSW, you can claim a lump sum for pain and suffering if:

You can also claim an additional lump sum for future loss of wages. You can claim this lump sum even if your permanent impairment is less than 10%.

So it’s important to understand the difference between minor and non-minor injuries to work out if you can claim car accident compensation for pain and suffering. It’s also important to note that even if you’ve been assessed as having non-minor injuries, there are situations when you might be able to change that assessment and claim a pain and suffering lump sum – read on to find out how.

*Permanent impairment is a scale that’s used to measure the permanent damage your accident has caused (physically and mentally).


How much do you get for pain and suffering in a car accident in NSW?

Car accident compensation for pain and suffering payout amounts can be substantial – the NSW CTP scheme has paid out $32 million* in pain and suffering lump sums in the 12 months to November 2020, and a further $29 million* in economic loss lump sums (past and future loss of wages).

Pain and suffering lump sums are based on a fixed scale that specifies how much you’ll get depending on the injury you’ve sustained. However, in most cases, the actual amount you receive will be reduced depending on the extent of your injury, on a sliding “partial” scale. For an estimate of your car accident injury entitlements, you can use this compensation payout calculator.

*According to SIRA Open Data, November 2020.

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How do I claim pain and suffering for my car accident injury?

If you’ve been injured in a car accident, you may have already made a claim for personal injury benefits, which provides you with payments to cover lost income, treatment and care expenses. However, you’ll need to submit a separate application for your pain and suffering lump sum. The form you submit for a lump sum claim is the same form you would submit to claim future loss of wages, so you’re effectively applying for both of these lump sums at once.

Here’s the claim process:

  1. Check your eligibility – (ie) that you were not at fault and your injuries have been assessed as non-minor.
  2. Check the timeframe – if your injuries are non-minor but less than 10% permanent impairment, then you can only lodge a lump sum claim for past and future loss of wages 20 months after the date of the accident.
  3. If your injuries are above 10% permanent impairment then you can claim your lump sums (for future loss of wages and pain and suffering) at any time.
  4. Click here to download the application form to submit your own claim for a lump sum.

Lump sum claims are complex, but the payout amounts can be substantial, so it’s strongly advised that you get legal advice before you lodge a lump sum claim. You can call our free advice line on 13 15 15 and one of our specialist CTP lawyers will assist you over the phone. Or, read our CTP Claims Guide.


What are minor and non-minor injuries?

When you’re injured in a car accident and you make an application for personal injury benefits or lump sums (including car accident compensation for pain and suffering), you’ll need to get your injuries assessed by a doctor. This assessment is used to classify your injuries as minor or non-minor.


My injures were assessed as minor – how can I claim pain and suffering?

You can only claim car accident compensation for pain and suffering if your injuries have been assessed as non-minor. However, if your injuries have been assessed as minor, here are four situations that might change your assessment to non-minor and allow you to claim pain and suffering:

  1. Your injuries were incorrectly assessed as minor, and should have been assessed as non-minor.
  2. One or more physical or psychological injuries were overlooked and not noted on your assessment, and you would have been assessed as non-minor if they had been noted.
  3. Your injuries have worsened over time and would now be classified as non-minor.
  4. Since your assessment, you have developed a psychological injury because of your accident that classifies as non-minor.

Many people risk missing out on car accident compensation for pain and suffering as their injuries have been assessed as being minor, even though they fall into one of these four categories.

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How can I get help with my pain and suffering lump sum claim in NSW?

When you claim car accident compensation for pain and suffering it’s likely you’ll get a better result with a lawyer on your side, and you might be able to get your legal fees paid by the CTP insurer of the at-fault vehicle.

For lump sum (common law) claims in NSW, there’s a schedule of fixed fees a solicitor can be paid to assist you for claims up to $75,000.

Law Partners is Australia’s largest specialist personal injury firm, with a number of solicitors who specialise in CTP claims and have helped many people claim car accident compensation for pain and suffering.


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